Greek ramblings
fruit and veg
lvo

The local fruit and vegetable markets are a real pleasure in Greece. They are always interesting and fun to wander round, with people shouting out the qualities of their wares and lots of banter and loud conversation.

market

The array of local fresh fruit and vegetables is enticing, and changes with the season.

At Christmas there will be huge mounds of walnuts, oranges and lemons. In September there are jars of freshly picked capers, and delicious sweet grapes. All of it looks much better quality than anything you can get in British supermarkets.

As well as the heaps of lemons, oranges, greens and potatoes, you'll see stalls selling locally produced honey, plastic bottles of homemade wine, olives, dried fruit and nuts, and sacks of beans and pulses.

stall

One section will be dedicated to fish stalls - with octopus and squid, prawns and sea bass and lots of other fish I couldn't name.

There is usually someone selling pot plants and flowers, herbs and seedlings.

In more rural areas you get people selling just a few eggs, or bunches of herbs, or some bottles of olive oil.

In Athens the street markets are held in different areas on different days. They start early, but are winding up by about 1pm.

market

It's usually easy to find them - just follow the stream of people with big metal shopping trollies.

Here are some of them:

Tuesdays and Thursdays in Kypselli

Friday in Ano Petralona

Friday in Kolonaki

Saturday in Exharia

Local markets in other places

market

Most small towns on the mainland will have a local market once a week.

There is a good market in Nafplio (on a Friday, we think) where as well as all the usual produce you'll also have the opportunity to buy live chickens should the fancy take you.

We've been at this market on a cold day in December, when all the stall holders had made open wood fires in an odd assortment of containers, adding to the general atmosphere.

market

Ermioni has a great local market on the harbour front on Saturdays.

In small towns the goods and methods of sale will vary slightly from those in Athens. So in Ermioni we saw someone selling plastic bottles of wine from the back of their motor bike, and someone else with homemade baskets.

Sometimes people are selling small amounts of a single produce, like greens, or garlic - the markets are outlets for very small scale, local producers, as well as larger farmers.

The larger islands like Crete and Rhodes will have their own local markets, but you don't usually see them on the smaller islands, where a lot more of the food has to be imported.